prince-fiction:

Puberty isn’t for everyone, Eren

prince-fiction:

Puberty isn’t for everyone, Eren

2,215 notes

faineemae:

eggplantlit:

carnivaloftherandom:

mresundance:

reckonedrightly:

indypendenthistory:

On Sep 13, 1944, a princess from India lay dead at Dachau concentration camp. She had been tortured by the Nazis, then shot in the head. Her name was Noor Inayat Khan. The Germans knew her only as Nora Baker, a British spy who had gone into occupied France using the code name Madeline. She carried her transmitter from safe house to safe house with the Gestapo trailing her, providing communications for her Resistance unit.

Oh my God, yes. Let’s talk about Noor Inayat Khan.
Wireless operators in France had a life expectancy of six weeks. Noor was actively transmitting for over three times as long.
While she was in France, every other wireless operator in her network was slowly picked off until she was the last radio link between London and Paris. It was “the most dangerous and important post in France”.  
She was offered a way back to Britain and refused.
In fact, in her transmissions to London, she once said that she was having the time of her life, and thanked them for giving her the opportunity to do this.
She was captured by the Gestapo, but never gave up: she made three attempt escapes. One involved asking to take a bath, insisting on being allowed to close the door to preserve her modesty, and then clambering onto the roof of the Gestapo HQ in Paris.
Her last word before being shot was, “Liberté!”

The term BAMF was coined for such persons. 

Her entire life, and her mother’s life as well, are FASCINATING. A Royal, Muslim, Anglo-Indian woman in WWII… Could we have a sweeping FACTUAL movie please. Like now?

Yet another story I would like to read.

You guys! There IS A MOVIE!
Enemy of the Reich: The Noor Inayat Khan Story 
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X2nM12xbAUM

faineemae:

eggplantlit:

carnivaloftherandom:

mresundance:

reckonedrightly:

indypendenthistory:

On Sep 13, 1944, a princess from India lay dead at Dachau concentration camp. She had been tortured by the Nazis, then shot in the head. Her name was Noor Inayat Khan. The Germans knew her only as Nora Baker, a British spy who had gone into occupied France using the code name Madeline. She carried her transmitter from safe house to safe house with the Gestapo trailing her, providing communications for her Resistance unit.

Oh my God, yes. Let’s talk about Noor Inayat Khan.

  • Wireless operators in France had a life expectancy of six weeks. Noor was actively transmitting for over three times as long.
  • While she was in France, every other wireless operator in her network was slowly picked off until she was the last radio link between London and Paris. It was “the most dangerous and important post in France”.  
  • She was offered a way back to Britain and refused.
  • In fact, in her transmissions to London, she once said that she was having the time of her life, and thanked them for giving her the opportunity to do this.
  • She was captured by the Gestapo, but never gave up: she made three attempt escapes. One involved asking to take a bath, insisting on being allowed to close the door to preserve her modesty, and then clambering onto the roof of the Gestapo HQ in Paris.
  • Her last word before being shot was, “Liberté!”

The term BAMF was coined for such persons. 

Her entire life, and her mother’s life as well, are FASCINATING. A Royal, Muslim, Anglo-Indian woman in WWII… Could we have a sweeping FACTUAL movie please. Like now?

Yet another story I would like to read.

You guys! There IS A MOVIE!

Enemy of the Reich: The Noor Inayat Khan Story 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X2nM12xbAUM

116,589 notes

1,455,915 plays

songbirdsofthesea:

slimmeroo:

holy shit

I read somewhere that sirens/mermaids sang songs that they heard from sailors on passing ships. I imagine this is what a modern siren would sound like singing this song.

(Source: jaesama)

152,213 notes

The trivial has its place, its entertainment value. I can think of no good reason that some people should not specialize in the behavior of the left-side hairs on an elephant’s trunk. Even at its best, its most deadly serious, criticism, like art, is partly a game, as all good critics know. My objection is not to the game but to the fact that contemporary critics have for the most part lost track of the point of their game, just as artists, by and large, have lost track of theirs. Fiddling with the hairs on an elephant’s nose is indecent when the elephant happens to be standing on the baby.

"At least in America art is not thought capable, these days, of tromping on babies. Yet it does so all the time, and what is worse, it does so with a bland smile. I’ve watched writers, composers, and painters knocking off their ‘works’ with their left hands. Nice people, most of them. Artists are generally pleasant people, childlike both in love and hate, intending no harm when they turn out bad paintings, compositions, or books. Indeed, their ambition guarantees that they will do the best they know how to do or think they ought to do. The error is less in their objects than in their objectives. ‘Art is play, or partly play,’ they’ll tell you with an engaging smile, serving up their non-nutritious fare with the murderous indifference of a fat girl serving up hamburgers. What they say is true enough, as far as it goes, and nothing is more tiresome than the man who keeps hollering, ‘Hey, let’s be serious!’ but that is what we must holler.

"In a world where nearly everything that passes for art is tinny and commercial and often, in addition, hollow and academic, I argue—by reason and by banging the table—for an old-fashioned view of what art is and does and what the fundamental business of critics ought therefore to be. Not that I want joy taken out of the arts; but even frothy entertainment is not harmed by a touch of moral responsibility, at least an evasion of too fashionable simplifications. My basic message throughout this book is as old as the hills, drawn from Homer, Plato, Aristotle, Dante, and the rest, and standard in Western civilization down through the eighteenth century; one would think all critics and artists should be thoroughly familiar with it, and perhaps many are. But my experience is that in university lecture halls, or in kitchens at midnight, after parties, the traditional view of art strikes most people as strange news.

"The traditional view is that true art is moral: it seeks to improve life, not debase it. It seeks to hold off, at least for a while, the twilight of the gods and us. I do not deny that art, like criticism, may legitimately celebrate the trifling. It may joke, or mock, or while away the time. But trivial art has no meaning or value except in the shadow of more serious art, the kind of art that beats back the monsters and, if you will, makes the world safe for triviality.

John Gardner, ON MORAL FICTION

A passage I think about, every now and then…

(via kurtbusiek)

34 notes

gailsimone:

Okay, many of you may know I tweet, and most of it is absolutely goony stuff not even worth reading. HOWEVER.

Sometimes, cool stuff happens.

Today on twitter, I challenged by writers friends to list the themes that drive their stories, with the hashtag #MyThemesAre

And as happens sometimes, it…

308 notes

everythingisterrible:

There is nothing in the world like Everything Is Festival. If you have the means, you should probably come.

68 notes

jeffreythompson:

Last year I had the pleasure of joining the talented crew over at Disney TV to contribute to the second season of Alex Hirsh’s Gravity Falls! Our season premiere aired a couple weeks ago so the crew and myself are finally able to share what we’ve been working on. I’m really happy with how the episode came together and the 2nd season as a whole is turning out to be something really special. I’ll continue to post artwork as the new episodes roll out. The 1st, 3rd, 4th, 5th, 6th, and last images are designed and painted by myself, the 2nd, 7th, 8th, and 9th were designed by our talented layout crew, and painted by me.  I’lll have to find and share the links to their sites soon! All artwork overseen by the amazing art director all around super boss man Ian Worrel.  UPDATE: Forgot to mention that images 3, and 4 were painted by me with some color adjustments by Ian. 

775 notes